Asthma
Asthma

 

What Is Asthma?

Asthma is a chronic lung disease characterized by inflammation and spasm of the airways. Causing breathing problems such as coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath. Asthma can be triggered by environmental factors, infections, allergies, exercise, temperature changes or other airway irritants. By properly managing asthma, however, such as avoiding being exposed to triggers, taking prescribed medications, looking for warning signs and knowing what to do during an asthma attack, an individual with asthma can have a healthy and active lifestyle.

Sulfites and sulfiting agents in foods (found in dried fruits, prepared potatoes, wine, bottled lemon or lime juice, and shrimp), and diagnosed food allergens (such as milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, soy, wheat, fish, and shellfish) have been found to trigger asthma. Many food ingredients such as food dyes and colors, food preservatives like BHA and BHT, monosodium glutamate, aspartame, and nitrite, have not been conclusively linked to asthma.

 learn about food sensitivity by clicking here

Know what is in your food.

The best way to avoid food-induced asthma is to eliminate or avoid the offending food or food ingredient from the diet or the environment. Reading ingredient information on food labels and knowing where food triggers of asthma found to be the best defenses against a food-induced asthma attack.

The Thirty Year Rise In Asthma.

 Asthma has risen in the United States during the past thirty years, which leads doctors to  believe that our changing diets could be the cause of this. As the general population eat fewer and fewer fruits and vegetables and more processed foods. Also it has many wondering if it possible  that we’re greatly increasing  our risk of developing asthma.  Studies have suggested this, and others are ongoing.

  A recent study of asthma and diet showed that teens with poor nutrition were more likely to have asthma symptoms. Those who didn’t get enough fruits and foods with vitamins C and E and omega-3 fatty acids were the most likely to have poor lung function. A  study done back in 2007 showed that children who grew up eating a Mediterranean diet — high in nuts and fruits like grapes, apples, and tomatoes — were less likely to have asthma-like symptoms.

 Foods to Help Asthma:

Apples; Studies suggest that those who ate two to five apples a week had a thirty-two percent lower risk of asthma then those who ate less

Vitamin C: A strong antioxidant that may fight off lung damage. Citrus fruits are highest in Vitamin C fruits like Cantaloupe Oranges, Grapefruit, Kiwi. And vegetables like  Broccoli, Brussels sprouts,and Tomatoes.

Beta Carotene:  Which is converted to Vitamin A may help reduce the incidences of asthma . Foods like carrots and other vibrant colored fruits and veggies like apricots, green peppers, and sweet potatoes.

Coffee/ Black Tea: Although it seems every story leads with some bad news about health effects of  caffeine.With regards to asthma, at least, caffeine is emerging as a good guy.  It is a  broncodilater that may improve air flow.

Avocado:  Avocados contain an  antioxidant called glutathione,  Their role in the body is to protect cells against the damage done by free radicals.

Flax seed: Very high in Omega 3 fatty acids and magnesium. Since magnesium helps relax the muscles surrounding the bronchi, the airways, and keeps them open.

Garlic:  This excellent anti-inflammatory contains allicin, an extremely powerful antioxidant 

Foods to avoid:

  Studies have shown these following foods are best avoided since they can promote asthma attacks.Though foods like milk can be have good and bad effects on asthma.  Those with an allergy to milk can cause wheezing coughing and other repository symptoms. However it is high in vitamin D which  may ease the symptoms of asthma

Red wine: may trigger asthma attacks, possibly due to the presence of  sulfites (also found in dried fruit and shrimp). 
Other studies suggest it might be the alcohol itself  .

Peanuts: A study found kids with asthma who also had a peanut allergy, develop asthma earlier than kids without a peanut allergy. Also more likely to be hospitalized and more likely to need steroids.They seem to also have allergies to grass, weeds, cats, dust mites and tree pollen, all of which can trigger asthma attacks.  

Salt: The number one aspect of asthma is inflammation and tightening of the airways, and salt can contribute to inflammation by causing fluid retention

Shellfish: The number three most common food allergy is shellfish. It can happen in children and adults. Beware also of hidden shellfish  products and of cross contamination. Unlike egg allergies, shellfish allergies usually stay with you your whole life.

Celebrities who can relate:

The following athletes and entertainers never let asthma stop them from being the best; Tom Dolan, Kurt Grote, Nancy Hogshead, Jim “Catfish” Hunter, Miguel Indurain, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Greg Louganis, George Murray, Robert Muzzio, Dennis Rodman, Mark Spitz,  Alberto Salazar, Kristi Yamaguchi, Tim Allen, Loni Anderson, Jason Alexander, Alice Cooper, Morgan Fairchild, Bob Hope, Billy Joel, Diane Keaton, Liza Minelli, Martin Scorsese, Paul Sorvino, Sharon Stone, Elizabeth Taylor, Orson Welles.

Our fitness professionals will  help you with various exercises and nutritional guidance to give you a healthy, happy, and active lifestyle,

 

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